Stateside Presents

MAX FROST

MAX FROST

UPSAHL

Mon, September 25, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Crescent Ballroom

Phoenix, AZ

$15.00

This event is 16 and over

MAX FROST
MAX FROST
It began as an experiment.

Music had always been the focus of my short, 17­year­old, guitar­playing life in Austin, Texas. I was obsessed with The Beatles, Hendrix, Sinatra, and Sam Cooke. The Blues were my foundation. I hung with a crowd of young musicians who shared my love of the classics. We listened to vinyl. We played in bands.

My safe, little vintage­rock world was turned on its head when underground hip­hop came knocking at my door. Rappers wanted me to sing hooks on their songs. I never in a million years thought what I did made sense in hip­hop. Eminem and Outkast had blown my mind as a kid, but it was still an alien world to me.

As uncomfortable as it was, I jumped in. At first, my bluesy singing made the hooks come across as a sort of “blue-eyed soul” thing. I didn’t identify with that. The hooks I loved most had been sampled from old records. They contrasted the beat in a cool way. They felt distorted and fuzzy and their juxtaposition with modern music had an accidental magic.

The experiment was to see if I could convince people that my hook was a sample. I sang more laid back, more like a crooner than a hard­attacking soul singer. I distorted my voice with guitar amps and heavy reverbs that created a huge space.
The summer I turned 19 I made this slow beat and wrote a hook over it called “Nice and Slow.” I used my sampled vocal approach and started sending the song around and playing it for people. The response was always, “Whoa! Where did you sample this from?” At that moment, my sound was born.

By the spring, my songs were gaining some attention. “Nice and Slow” and “White Lies” charted on Hype Machine and a few months later I signed with Atlantic Records. A major-label deal marked a serious second chapter in my creative life. Songs were no longer practice swings. They counted. There were real stakes now. But with a new opportunity in front of me, I dove in head first.

I now had access to collaborators and studios that enabled me to indulge in new sounds. Though I remained a producer on all the tracks and played 90 percent of the instruments, the songs were elevated thanks to the input of the brilliant writers and producers I met — guys like Benny Blanco, Nick Ruth, and Franc Tetaz. What began as an experiment in a basement lab blossomed into a larger-scale process, resulting in the songs on my EP, Intoxication.

Sonically, I was inspired by artists like Amy Winehouse and Raphael Saadiq, who breathed fresh life into the classic ’60s soul sound. Their vintage songs have a modern edge to the production. My process is the reverse. I try to write songs that, if played on an acoustic guitar, are very modern. But my execution of the singing, instrumentation, and production is vintage.

Lyrically, the songs on Intoxication personify love, money, and death as a drug, reflecting the way my submission to imagination has consumed me like a chemical.

My experiment became an abstract mind state that I want the listener to visit.

UPDATES MAY 2017

The experiment of music has led me to places I never thought I’d go in this world. In 2016, I did shows in Australia, Germany, London, and all over the US. It always shocks me to speak face to face with a person who has been listening to my music from the other side of the globe for years. It reminds me that, despite how much time I spend alone in a dark studio, there’s a world of people out there that you are trying to reach. If you really expose your truth to them in a song, it doesn’t matter where they are. They will respond.

My travels have also led me to collaborations with artists around the world. I released a track called “Ghosting” with an amazing producer named St. Albion and also wrote/produced a track for a new artist from Australia named Mike Waters. As much as I’m focused on my own music right now, I look forward to one day spending a lot of time helping other people develop their own experiments.

My last year of high school and only year of college were only made possible by my abuse of Adderall. I first discovered its powers attempting to write college essays, and pretty much lost my mind from there. It allowed me to get away with chronic procrastination and mainly focus on music. But it certainly spiraled me into an unbalanced state of sleeplessness, anxiousness, highs, and lows that left me a pretty worn out person.

My Adderall years manifested themselves in a song I made with Cook Classics and Ross Golan called “Adderall” that I recently released. I sort of told the sad story in a funny way and tried to make it light hearted, and it seems that people have reacted. I’ll do college shows now where people come with their prescription bottles and ask me to sign them (which might be a crime or something I don’t know…).
UPSAHL
UPSAHL
ABOUT UPSAHL

It’s nearly impossible to believe that Taylor Upsahl, who goes by simply UPSAHL, just tossed her mortarboard in the air as a high school graduate. For someone so young, the Phoenix, AZ native is a remarkably skilled singer, songwriter and performer. It’s no wonder the Phoenix New Times proclaimed that her “songwriting will blow you away” and that her songs “transcend her teenage years, with catchy lyrics and melodies relatable to all ages.”

Born into a musical family, UPSAHL started playing both guitar and piano at the age of five. “My dad was touring in bands long before I was born,” shares Upsahl, “so I was lucky enough to have a band room in my house all throughout my childhood. Having access to instruments and a thorough understanding of music allowed me to start writing my own stuff when I was 13.” By the time she was 14 years old, UPSAHL had written and released a self-titled EP, which gained much-deserved recognition throughout the Phoenix music scene. Then, in 2015, she pieced together a band and self-produced her first full-length album, Viscerotonic.

UPSAHL is celebrating the recent release of her highly acclaimed third album, Unfamiliar Light, which brilliantly showcases UPSAHL’s stunning vocals and mesmerizing piano work. Following the release of Unfamiliar Light, UPSAHL released her latest single, a bouncy, rhythmic and poignant track called “Can You Hear Me Now.”

Influenced by artists like The Shins, Spoon, Lorde and Beyoncé, UPSAHL has an undeniable ability to write songs that can permeate your psyche, forcing you to tap into your deepest emotions. “I like to maintain powerful and complex lyrics that are relatable to a variety of people in a variety of situations,” shares Upsahl. “I especially like to write about relationships, friendships, politics and important societal issues.”

Over the next few years, UPSAHL will be spending most of her time in Los Angeles, working with producers and collaborators on future projects and bringing her irresistible music to the masses.
Venue Information:
Crescent Ballroom
308 N. 2nd Ave.
Phoenix, AZ, 85003
http://www.crescentphx.com/