Stateside Presents

PICKWICK

PICKWICK

RADIATION CITY, SPAIN

Sun, March 10, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Crescent Ballroom

Phoenix, AZ

$12 advance - $14 at the door

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

PICKWICK
PICKWICK
To hear Pickwick tell it, their popular Myths 7-inch series was merely a group of rough sketches they'd been developing over the previous two years put to wax. That a CD collection of those "demos" held their hometown Seattle's Sonic Boom Records #1 sales spot for a period of weeks in 2011 shows those six songs amounted to something more than tossed off basement recordings. With a successful year of festival invites and an ever larger string of hometown sell-outs behind them in 2012 the band refocused on recording and have a year later emerged with Can't Talk Medicine. Upgrading from the basement used for Myths and setting up shop in their living room, the band's own multi-instrumentalist Kory Kruckenberg served as engineer. The 13 finished tracks include three re-recorded and fully realized Myths cuts and a collaboration with Sharon Van Etten on lead single "Lady Luck."
"A cool thing about this record," says Kruckenberg, "this house has made its way onto the record. We've tried to include the quirks of living here." Guitarist Michael Parker wryly spins the situation differently saying "our record doesn't sound like a lot of other records because it was recorded in this living room." The choice of a carpeted location may have been a double-edged sword, but the use of this unconventional space was fully compatible with the band's own grittier leanings and desire to establish a unique musical aesthetic. By recording to 1/2 inch tape on an 8 track and incorporating found sounds, Kruckenberg was additionally using a canvas that provided for an intentionally different dynamic than a modern digital effort. Why tape? "It's about dirtiness," Kruckenberg explains referring to the distortion that the taping process itself can imbue on a recorded sound. He reports his final results with a grin, "It's raw."
An audiophile's full attention to every detail shows in the final mix: voices and instruments have the space to assert their full identity and tones shimmer in lengthy decay. The percussive clang of the piano hammers in lead track "Halls of Columbia" are incorporated instead of hidden away. The organ drone in "Window Sill" is elevated from dissonant psych clutter to an eerie foundational element. The harmonies of Parker, keyboardist Cassady Lillstrom, and guest Kaylee Cole are at turns sweet, unsettling and epiphanic. It's all orchestrated to support frontman Galen Disston's gospel growl and build on the mood of his words.
"There is a layer to our songs that I don't think very many people have picked up on," says Disston, who prefers listeners delve into their own imagination with his words over providing a literal history of every lyric. What he will relate is that Can't Talk Medicine mines themes of mental illness. "It's about art making you go crazy," he reveals. "We idolize and value that insanity when it's in the name of art." But as his lyrics also imagine it, life in creative overdrive can be nervous, desperate and grotesque. The refrain in "Window Sill" speaks of planning a defiant suicide and Myths crowd favorite "Hacienda Motel" recounts a risque homicide.
Many of the deeper answers about influences and a preference for mystery can be traced to the band's own voracious interest in music that's mired in obscurity. Reissues from Designer Records, the seminal output of the Black Ark. Robert Pete Williams, Alan Lomax, the Walkmen, The Sonics, and Abner Jay are among the diverse list of names referred to with reverence in the living room. 'Famous L. Renfroe as The Flying Sweet Angel of Joy' is a current well of inspiration for Disston who, like his idol Bob Dylan, has through his own deep exploration of American roots music developed a signature vocal delivery.
Pickwick's DIY history of making & distributing their own records continues into 2013 with the Spring self-release Can't Talk Medicine, initially available digitally via iTunes and on CD at your local CIMS-affiliated independent record shop. The Cold War Kids' Matt Maust is guilty of the album's cover design. The band travels to SXSW in March before embarking on a headlining tour of the continental U.S. in April.
RADIATION CITY
RADIATION CITY
Born from the memory-dreams of yesterparents' vinyl, there's something aged about Radiation City that will take you away on nostalgia wiser than your years while thoughtfully reminiscing in something you've yet to hear. (Willamette Week)

Cool Nightmare

The inspiration for Radiation City's newest output stems from an old piano. The piano has lived in drummer Randy Bemrose's basement for eons. It's old, cumbersome, and on it's last legs. The band used sounds from the piano throughout the recording of this new EP… not just the keys though, the clicks and clacks from the body, the slamming of the lid, and virtually every other sound you can imagine making on the piano. After they were finished, the piano was beat up, out of tune, and falling apart. Having used the old piano of all it's worth, and as a celebration of an intense year, Radiation City engaged in the ceremonial destruction of the old piano documented on the first single's video, "Find it of Use.

Cool Nightmare is the followup to the dream-pop quintet's acclaimed debut, The Hands That Take You, released this past fall on Tender Loving Empire (Typhoon, Loch Lomond). Originally out via cassette on Radiation City founders Cameron Spies and Lizzy Ellison's cassette-only record label Apes Tapes, The Hands That Take You has been lauded by MTV, ELLE, Brooklyn Vegan, Paste, FuseTV, Prefix, and The L Magazine.

Radiation City is influenced by certain staple macro-genres such as 60?s bossa nova and Chicago jazz, but their version of this classical sound is supported by irresistible pop vocal hooks and the employment of minimal electronics which provide rhythm but leave plenty of space. The band will soon embark on their first trip to SXSW as part of a tour that will take them down the West Coast and through the Midwest.

Radiation City is Lizzy Ellison (vocals, keys), Cameron Spies (guitar, vocals), Randy Bemrose (drums, vocals), Matt Rafferty (bass, vocals), Patti King (vocals, keys, bass).
SPAIN
SPAIN
Josh Haden, son of bass-playing jazz great Charlie Haden, founded Spain in Los Angeles in 1993.
Their debut, The Blue Moods Of Spain, was released on Restless Records in 1995. Born from the
same L.A. alternative rock scene in the early 1990s that gave rise to Beck, Weezer, and that dog.,
Spain's music was a response to the then-current inundation of loud, aggressive guitar rock. With
Blue Moods, Spain became aligned with the "slowcore" subgenre along with bands like Low
and Red House Painters, but their sound drew equally from West Coast jazz, rhythm and blues,
country and '60s soul. The Blue Moods Of Spain garnered the band a devoted cult following
and they toured the U.S., Europe, and Australia. They performed on French TV, and opened for
Cocteau Twins during their final U.S. tour.

In the mid-late 1990s, several songs from Blue Moods were featured in different films and TV
shows. Film director Wim Wenders commissioned the band to write a song for his film End
Of Violence. Spain's song "Spiritual" was recorded by Johnny Cash on his Grammy-winning,
Rick Rubin-produced Unchained, and by Charlie Haden and Pat Metheny on their Grammy-
winning Beyond The Missouri Sky.

Spain's 1999 sophomore CD, She Haunts My Dreams, found the band headlining large venues
across Europe. A song from the album, "Our Love Is Gonna Live Forever," was featured
prominently in an episode of the HBO series Six Feet Under.

The third CD, I Believe, was released in 2001, after which Haden took an extended break from
the band. Restless Records released Spirituals: The Best Of Spain in 2003, signaling the apparent
end of Spain.

In 1999, Haden had worked with producer Dan the Automator (Gorillaz) on the Handsome Boy
Modeling School record So… How's Your Girl? lending vocals to the track "Sunshine," a duet
with Sean Lennon. This led to Josh's subsequent touring with Handsome Boy in 2005-2006, and
to his solo CD Devoted (2006), produced by Dan the Automator for Dreamworks Records (later
released on Haden's own Diamond Soul Recordings). In 2007, Josh decided to halt this solo
career and reform Spain with all-new members.

This past May saw the release of their first full-length album of new material in over ten
years, The Soul Of Spain, and they've hit the road again, recently playing shows in Europe and
returning to the States for concerts in celebration of their new album. Omnivore Recordings, a
vinyl reissue label based in Los Angeles, has announced that they will be releasing all three of

Spain's previous records on limited edition colored vinyl in August 2012.
Venue Information:
Crescent Ballroom
308 N. 2nd Ave.
Phoenix, AZ, 85003
http://www.crescentphx.com/