Stateside Presents

THE CAVE SINGERS

Stat

THE CAVE SINGERS

BLEEDING RAINBOW, GOLDEN BOOTS

Tue, April 23, 2013

8:00 pm (event ends at 11:30 pm)

Solar Culture

Tucson, AZ

This event is all ages

THE CAVE SINGERS
THE CAVE SINGERS
Here is the mystery of Seattle's Cave Singers: They never listened to much folk music, they never intended to play folk music, and more importantly, their guitarist never picked up the instrument until recently. Yet, this strange trio is writing and performing some of the most hypnotizing folk music we have today.

One listen to Invitation Songs, however, and you're ready to call bullshit on them. It sounds like an updated version of the Anthology of American Folk Music. Not the graduate-student, learned interpretations of folk music circa 1962, but folk music approached by way of punk rock. It's sparse, melodic, creepy, and alluring, like the widow mourning graveside in Johnny Cash's "Long Black Veil". Guitarist Derek Fudesco's bottom-end acoustic work sounds like Mississippi John Hurt's soft, rolling finger plucks. Singer Pete Quirk's appealingly nasal voice simultaneously echoes Arlo Guthrie and a mosquito's buzz. And drummer Marty Lund plays like he's slapping a newspaper on a kitchen table.

Though Quirk spent time in Seattle post-punk group Hint Hint, Lund in Cobra High, and Fudesco as bassist for Pretty Girls Make Graves and the legendary Murder City Devils, maybe they've been folk artists all along and we just haven't been open to the idea.

The band maintains that they never made a conscious effort to play a certain 'style' of music, and that, besides the odd Dylan record, their favorite bands are still the Replacements, the Pixies, Fleetwood Mac. With that in mind, I do believe it was Big Bill Broonzy who quipped: "All music is folk music."

Invitation Songs is the Cave Singers' debut. It was recorded in Vancouver, British Columbia by Colin Stewart (PGMG, Black Mountain), and its title is appropriate; it is one of the warmest and most welcoming records of 2007. Each track is coated in a dense atmosphere that feels humid but not stifling. The shuffle-stomp rhythms on "Seeds of Night" and "Dancing on our Graves" recall Civil War marches, highlighting Lund's innate abilities. Elsewhere, on "Royal Lawns" harmonicas sigh and echo back like ghosts in abandoned railway cars. The brooding, washboard-driven "Called" is kin to Ugly Casanova's chain-gang musings, and Quirk's mid-song yelps don't sound planned, but rather like the ultimate summoning of his inner turmoil.

"Helen", a classic tale of a long lost lover ("Helen, you're eyes are frozen in my brain"), employs a wavering synth to create a Martian blues vibe. On the rustic rock-flavored "Oh Christine", another strummy song of a love just out of reach, Quirk takes on an almost jazz-poet tone. "I saw you smoking in the bar just the other night/If I saw you right...I saw you drinking in the bar just the other day/And what's that I heard you say?" Nothing fancy, but he sings as if he is conjuring memories so personal he has to force them through his pinched teeth.

You see, the Cave Singers' music demands attention. You'll throw this record on, maybe in the morning while you're getting ready for work. Then, in the middle of the day, one of Quirk's lyrics or Fudesco's riffs will pop into your head, the way a Townes Van Zandt song does. You won't be able to shake it. You'll go home and listen to it again. Pretty soon, Invitation Songs will have worked its way into your subconscious and become the soundtrack to this moment in your life. Invitation Songs will remain a part of you forever.
BLEEDING RAINBOW
BLEEDING RAINBOW
Nevermind the constant threat of a cease and desist letter, when Carrie Brownstein tells you that your band name is weak, you change it. But it isn't as simple as a name change for Philadelphia's minimal noise pop duo Reading Rainbow, significant line up additions facilitated the adoption of a new moniker. So...drum roll please...as we reintroduce Philadelphia's Bleeding Rainbow, now a full-blown, Brownstein-approved, rock quartet. The name better represents the band's evolving sound and is all around more badass and trippy as sh*t. The founding members, Sarah Everton, who moved from drums to bass to give her vocals a better chance to shine, and vocalist/guitarist Rob Garcia are now joined by Al Creedon on lead guitar and drummer Greg Frantz.
While 2010's album release Prism Eyes gained significant attention and raised the band's profile among the indie elite, even that set might not be aware of the previous self-released album Mystical Participation. If Prism Eyes is, by their own description, their attempt at writing pop songs, and Mystical Participation emphasizes an aesthetic of loud and drone-y guitars instead of focused song structure, Yeah Right, the band's third album release set for October 9th, 2012 on Kanine Records, is the merging and maturation of all these ideas and sounds.
For Yeah Right, the band has opted for a bi-polar approach to production, pushing the extremes of murky, ominous and sometimes harsh and fuzzed-out guitar onslaughts ("Pink Ruff") as well as a strong repertoire of hushed, ethereal moments ("Cover the Sky") aiming to evoke a nostalgia for 90s slacker culture without sounding bored or contrived. While previous releases reside in the reverb-soaked psychedelic pop realm, Bleeding Rainbow says, "the sound this time around was more directly influenced by bands from our teenage-hood such as Sonic Youth, My Bloody Valentine, Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, and Yo La Tengo to name a few." Mixing hints of Greg Sage's anthemic, anxiety-ridden punk riffs, with equal parts drone and noise swells reminiscent of Kevin Shields at his most inventive, with an overlaying of boy-girl harmonies, Bleeding Rainbow channels the Mamas and the Papas as if backed by early Smashing Pumpkins.
With the inclusion of two long time friends and supporters of the band, Bleeding Rainbow has not only freed itself from the limitations of a two-piece, but given themselves a chance to delve deeper into the mood of songs and allow for extended instrumental sections ("Drift Away"). A more collaborative songwriting approach has resulted in more complex songs, but that does not mean they are without pretty sounds or pop moments. So while Yeah Right opens up easy and welcoming ("Go Ahead"), the end will leave you feeling as if a wall of noise has permeated through your body ("Get Lost"). Bleeding Rainbow set out to create something beautiful from harsh noise, and Yeah Right succeeds wildly at doing just that.
GOLDEN BOOTS
GOLDEN BOOTS
Venue Information:
Solar Culture
31 East Toole
Tucson, AZ, 85701
http://www.solarculture.org/